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Ephesians

Sermon Series Artwork • Park Church • September 2018

Oil painting and illustration by Benjamin Rogers.

One of our largest and most involved projects this summer was directing artwork for Ephesians at Park Church. We commissioned the incredible Benjamin Rogers to create an original piece for the series, and within the piece he placed several diversely-illustrated arguments from the Scripture. There’s too much of interest to share here—please see the artwork essay at parkchurchdenver.org to learn about all the goodness here!

On our end, we took photos of his artwork and created two 3×15′ banners and five 3×3′ wooden panels for the stage at Park Church, in addition to creating the logotype.

The complete, original painting and illustration

The five 3×3′ wooden panel prints

The two 3×15′ banners

The complete Park Church stage from the balcony, including the “Ephesians” logotype

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Ten

Sermon Series Artwork • Trinity Church Denver • September 2018

In their fall series on the Ten Commandments, Trinity Church Denver is working to depict this familiar topic not as “rules that inhabit us,” but as a framework that gives us life because of the work of Christ. To argue this visually, we contrasted the traditional understanding of the Ten Commandments—rigid and lifeless stone—with an in-Christ understanding of bright, approachable, vivid life—the watercolor floral wreath. Additionally, since Christ is the key to enjoying a life under God’s good rules, we added a notch to the “T” as a pointer to the Rock cleft for us; the stone struck in the wilderness to give us life.

Vision For LIfe

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Life Together

Sermon Series Artwork • Fellowship Denver Church • August 2018

Fellowship Denver is working through Romans 12 this August, exploring what a life of service informed by the Gospel looks like. In all their artwork, Fellowship has a unique, simple-geometric style that we love. Starting from that inspiration, we were shooting to communicate the link between the historic church and the modern church, almost to say, “This life of Gospel-service has always been who we are.”

The top hand symbolizes the historic church (in a first-century robe), while the bottom hand symbolizes the modern church (see the Apple Watch? If that’s too extra, try to just see a normal watch). The triangles around the outside of the work can symbolize two things: (1) the individual pieces that fit together in seemingly-random ways to make the whole (Rom. 12:4–5), and (2) a service informed by the Trinitarian God, whose three members eternally serve each other.

Vision For LIfe

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Life On Mission

Sermon Series Artwork • The Heights Church • July 2018

Life on Mission at The Heights Church is a series exploring the teachings of Jesus on mission-living from the book of Matthew. We had three concepts for the series and loved all of them. The visual argument options are many when Jesus teaches with vivid metaphor after vivid metaphor—it was really fun. The piece we ended up with is this visualization of the one lost sheep apart from the other 99, whom the Good Shepherd spares no expense or effort to rescue (Matthew 18). The off-center positioning of the words and the shape of the rest of the “flock” draw an invisible diagonal line, working to move one’s eyes directionally from the flock to the missing sheep.

Vision For LIfe

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Who Is Jesus?

Sermon Series Artwork • The Heights Church • February 2018

This artwork for The Heights was done by Bruce Butler.

The idea of the Who is Jesus? series is to take a look at the myriad messages we’ve heard about the person of Jesus and distill them with the Word of God, seperating myths and cultural additions from the truth. Bruce illustrated this by taking several pictures of Jesus that depict Him in different styles (and with skin colors, for that matter) and creating a “composite” image that completes a fractured face, referencing the shape of a crown.

This is what we nerd out about as designers and church communicators—marrying the artistic to the rhetorical. We’re grateful for Bruce as a partner and for this excellent example of our goal in designing for the Church.

United

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United

Sermon Series Artwork • The Heights Church • January 2018

United is an annual sermon series on The Heights’ three core values as a church—Gospel, Community, and Mission.

To depict these three elements, we used three images and chopped and blended and such to create this. The plant represents “rootedness” in the Gospel (Eph. 3) and our corresponding flourising (Ps. 1). The birds on power lines represent a Community bound together by His powerful energy (Col 1:29). Lastly, the image of the city representents Mission, showing part of Manhattan that is both distinct (known) but also indisctinct (unkonwn, not “here”), attempting to demonstrate that our mission field as believers is local, semi-local, and global.

United

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Genesis

Sermon Series Artwork • Park Church • January 2018

Illustration by Christian Robinson.

We’re quite excited to share about this triptych we coordinated for Park Church. Christian is quite an excellent illustrator and working with him was real, real rad.

The two main pieces symbolize two of the main narrative arcs of Genesis: Part I depicts God’s creation of the world (the foliage) and its subsequent de-creation through mankind (the hand) as a result of satanic temptation (the snake) and human rebellion. Part II depicts God’s creation of a people (the 12 stars for 12 tribes of Israel) as God (the hand) comes to Abraham and makes a covenant (the scroll) with him and his descendants.

The third part depicts the Tree of Life, as described both in Genesis (in the garden) and in Revelation (in the holy city).

To display the artwork, we printed on two 4×8 foot sheets of birch to hand in the Park Church sanctuary (see photos below). A third peice is in process for the main lobby area, depicting the tree of life.

Parts I–III Digitally

Part I After Installation

A Preliminary Mockup of The Stage

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Insomnia

Sermon Series Artwork • Eastern Hills Community Church • December 2017

The image elicits the terrible feeling of staring at the clock and thinking intensely about something while you should be asleep. The irony hidden only one layer down is that, in the image, it’s clearly daytime. The things that “keep us up” are often either already resolved for us in Christ or are completely overshadowed by the greater comfort of Christ.

Insomnia

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Colossians

Sermon Series Artwork • The Heights Church • September 2017

We’ve been vibing with this grungy text thing this summer. The team at The Heights was clear that they just wanted the words Colossians: Full & Free over a simple background. As many times as we’ve made artwork that fits in this vein, we specifically love how this one came out! There’s a lightness here that keeps up with the dirt in the lettering—a hopefully-fitting illustration for their arguments from the book of Colossians.

Who Are We?

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Worship

Sermon Series Artwork • Eastern Hills • September 2017

A vintage take on lettering and texture, seeking to communicate the “old” in a new way by showing “bright” grit, the “manual”/physical nature of worship both with the obvious rasied-hands and the hand-drawn letters.

Who Are We?